Misc

University City Keystone Innovation Zone Expands to Old City, N3rd Street Startup Community

Theo tin prweb.comrn

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rnPHILADELPHIA, PA (PRWEB) MARCH 23, 2016rnrnToday Mayor Jim Kenney and the Philadelphia Department of Commerce, alongside The University City Keystone Innovation Zone (UC KIZ), announced that the UC KIZ has received approval from the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) to expand its existing boundaries to include the growing tech community in Old City, including the area along N. 3rd Street, known as “N3rd Street.rn“The expansion of the UC KIZ is an incredibly important development for Philadelphia's startup community," said Mayor Jim Kenney. "The inclusion of Old City will bolster the already exciting growth of tech companies we've seen on and around N3rd St. We’re committed to helping Philadelphia’s innovation community flourish throughout the City, and tools like KIZs are a big part of that equation.”rnrnAs a result of the expansion, a new swath of companies in Philadelphia’s growing innovation ecosystem will be able to access up to $100,000 annually in sellable tax credits. The DCED could award as much as $1.2 million in tax credits to newly eligible companies within the expanded zone in 2017. Many KIZ Tax Credit awardees invest those funds in new employees, while others purchase equipment to further develop and commercialize products and technologies.rnrn“We need to nurture the talent pipeline that exists in Pennsylvania from higher education to business ownership by providing as many opportunities as possible to support their efforts,” said Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin. “We are thrilled with the success of the KIZ program and are extremely excited with the increased opportunities available in Philadelphia through the expansion of the UC KIZ.”rnrnPennsylvania’s Keystone Innovation Zone Tax Credit is a fundamental component of the KIZ program. Up to $25 million in credits are available each year to eligible companies. Companies without tax liabilities can sell their tax credits themselves or secure a third-party, independent broker to sell the credits on their behalf.rnrn“Innovation and entrepreneurship are thriving all across Philadelphia – from University City and uCity Square all the way to N3rd Street,” says Stephen S. Tang, Ph.D., MBA, President & CEO of the University City Science Center, which serves as the fiscal agent of the UC KIZ. “Thanks to this expansion, the UC KIZ will be better equipped to accommodate and support the cluster of tech startups in Old City while helping to attract and retain even more early-stage companies in Philadelphia.”rnrnTwenty-one startup companies in the UC KIZ received a collective $1.8 million in tax credits awarded by the DCED in 2015 as part of the KIZ Tax Credit Program. Over the last 10 years, 48 UC KIZ companies have benefited from almost $8 million in KIZ Tax Credits.rnrn“Our recent KIZ Tax Credit award will help our company retain two software developers” says first-time applicant John Nosek, Founder and Vice President for Research and Product Innovation at Guiding Technologies. “Also, these tax credits meet requirements for matching National Science Foundation (NSF) SBIR Phase IB funding, which enhances our chances of obtaining much larger NSF SBIR Phase II and Phase IIB funding.”rnrnAbout the University City Keystone Innovation Zone rnThe University City Keystone Innovation Zone was established in 2004 by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority as a Keystone Innovation Zone, a geographically designated zone designed to create a “knowledge neighborhood” that develops technology business communities by aligning talent and resources. It is a partnership of BioAdvance, Drexel University, Thomas Jefferson University, the University City Science Center, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and The Wistar Institute. UC KIZ partners are committed to working together to ensure that life sciences and information technology opportunities are developed and supported to maximize the potential of university research, start-up companies and international companies seeking to locate in the region. The Science Center serves as the administrative and fiscal agent of the UC KIZ.rnrnFor more information about the University City Keystone Innovation Zone, call (215) 966-6156 or visit https://www.sciencecenter.org/programs/university-city-keystone-innovation-zone.

Pennsylvania Lottery Bán Gần 16 Ngàn Vé Powerball Mỗi Phút Lúc 1 giờ 30 Phút Chiều Ngày 13 Tháng 1 Năm 2016

Theo tin Pennsylvania LotteryrnrnBrisk Powerball Sales Greatly Benefit Older PennsylvaniansrnrnMIDDLETOWN, Pa., Jan. 13, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Ticket sales for tonight's world record Powerball® drawing are generating tens of millions of dollars for programs that benefit older adults, the Pennsylvania Lottery said today. The jackpot for tonight's Powerball drawing has a $1.5 billion annuity value or a $930 million cash prize.rnrn"Tickets will be available until 9:59 p.m. Wednesday and we urge all players to please play responsibly," said Pennsylvania Lottery Executive Director Drew Svitko. "This world-record jackpot has been great for Powerball players and winners, as well as for the older Pennsylvanians who benefit from Lottery proceeds."rnrnAs of Wednesday afternoon, the Pennsylvania Lottery had sold more than $155.6 million in Powerball tickets since the historic jackpot run began in November, which translates into nearly $62.2 million in new funding to support benefits for older Pennsylvanians – a number that will rise as sales continue. Last year, the Pennsylvania Lottery generated over $1 billion to support programs that benefit older adults. rnrnAt 1:30 p.m. the Pennsylvania Lottery was selling approximately 16,000 Powerball tickets per minute, statewide.rnrnBefore rolling to a $1.3 billion jackpot on Saturday night, Powerball® produced hundreds of thousands of winners across Pennsylvania – including a $1 million winner, seven winners of $150,000, numerous $50,000 winners and many more. The jackpot was boosted on Monday to $1.4 billion annuity value or an $868 million cash prize. On Tuesday, it was raised to a $1.5 billion annuity value or a $930 million cash prize.rnrnThis jackpot has been rolling since the November 4, 2015, drawing. Since then, in Pennsylvania alone, Powerball has produced a total of more than 2.1 million winners of over $22 million in prizes, including one $2 million winner and three $1 million winners.rnrnIf Wednesday's jackpot is won by a Pennsylvania player, it would become the state's 20th multi-state jackpot win. The Pennsylvania Lottery has sold 17 jackpot-winning Powerball tickets and two jackpot-winning Mega Millions tickets.rnrnThe largest Powerball prize Pennsylvania has ever awarded was a $110.2 million cash-value jackpot claimed by a New Jersey couple in May, 2004. The state's largest Powerball group win was a $107.5 million cash jackpot shared by 48 transit workers in the Philadelphia area in April, 2012.rnrnPlayers are reminded to check every ticket, every time. In Pennsylvania, winners have one year from the drawing date to claim their prizes. Winners cannot be identified until prizes are claimed and tickets are validated.rnrnHow to play Powerball: Players pay $2 and select five white balls from the first set of 69 numbers plus a single red ball, the Powerball, from a second set of 26 numbers. Players may select their own numbers using a Powerball playslip, or they may opt for computer-selected quick picks. Players must match all five numbers drawn plus the Powerball number to win the jackpot. There also are eight additional ways for players to win a cash prize.rnrnPurchasing the $1 Power Play option allows a winner to increase lower-tier prizes by a factor of 2, 3, 4 or 5, depending on the Power Play number drawn. A 10X multiplier will be available for the Match 4+1 prize and lower prize tiers when the jackpot is at or below $150 million, or when announced. The jackpot and the Match 5 prize are not multiplied. The Match 5 prize with the Power Play option is worth $2 million. It is $1 million without Power Play.rnrnPowerball is sold in 44 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In Pennsylvania, tickets are sold until 9:59 p.m. on drawing nights, Wednesday and Saturday.rnrnAbout the Pennsylvania Lottery: The Pennsylvania Lottery remains the only state lottery that designates all its proceeds to programs that benefit older residents. Since its inception in 1971, the Pennsylvania Lottery has contributed more than $25.8 billion to programs that include property tax and rent rebates; free transit and reduced-fare shared rides; the low-cost prescription drug programs PACE and PACENET; long-term living services; and the 52 Area Agencies on Aging, including full- and part-time senior centers throughout the state.rnrnThe Pennsylvania Lottery reminds players to check every ticket, every time. Players must be 18 or older. Please play responsibly. For help with a gambling problem, call 1-800-848-1880.rnrnFor drawings results, winning numbers, winners' stories and to subscribe to the Lottery's RSS news feed, visit www.palottery.com. Like us on Facebook at or follow us at www.twitter.com/palottery. rnrnMEDIA CONTACT: Lottery Public Relations, 717-702-8008rnrn rnrnSOURCE Pennsylvania LotteryrnrnrnrnRELATED LINKS

Giải Thưởng Lô Ðộc Ðắc Powerball Lên Kỷ Lục 1 Tỷ 500 Triệu Đồng Đô La Mỹ Từ 1 Tỷ 300 Triệu Sau Ngày 11 Tháng 1 Năm 2016

Theo tin Pennsylvania LotteryrnrnPowerball Grows Again to Record $1.5 Billion JackpotrnrnMIDDLETOWN, Pa., Jan. 12, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Powerball® jackpot for the January 13 drawing was increased today to a world record $1.5 billion annuity value or a $930 million cash prize – thanks to continued ticket sales.rnrn"We encourage players to please play responsibly and remember that you only need one ticket in order to win," said Pennsylvania Lottery Executive Director Drew Svitko. "If you are planning to play, remember that tickets will be sold in Pennsylvania until 9:59 p.m. on Wednesday evening."rnrnBefore rolling to a $1.3 billion jackpot on Saturday night, Powerball® produced hundreds of thousands of winners across Pennsylvania – including a $1 million winner, seven winners of $150,000, numerous $50,000 winners and many more. The jackpot was boosted on Monday to $1.4 billion annuity value or an $868 million cash prize.rnrnIn total, more than 914,600 Pennsylvania Lottery Powerball tickets won prizes of various amounts in the January 9 drawing, including 157,205 tickets purchased with the Power Play option that multiplied their prizes by three. See the full January 9 payout listing at palottery.com.rnrnPlayers are reminded to check every ticket, every time. In Pennsylvania, winners have one year from the drawing date to claim their prizes. Winners cannot be identified until prizes are claimed and tickets are validated.rnrnThis jackpot has been rolling since the November 4, 2015, drawing. Since then, in Pennsylvania alone, Powerball has produced a total of more than 2.1 million winners of over $22 million in prizes, including one $2 million winner and three $1 million winners.rnrnSvitko noted that the jackpot run has been good for Powerball players and also the older Pennsylvanians who benefit from Lottery proceeds. Last year, the Pennsylvania Lottery generated over $1 billion to support benefit programs for older adults. rnrnIf Wednesday's jackpot is won by a Pennsylvania player, it would become the state's 20th multi-state jackpot win. The Pennsylvania Lottery has sold 17 jackpot-winning Powerball tickets and two jackpot-winning Mega Millions tickets.rnrnThe largest Powerball prize Pennsylvania has ever awarded was a $110.2 million cash-value jackpot claimed by a New Jersey couple in May, 2004. The state's largest Powerball group win was a $107.5 million cash jackpot shared by 48 transit workers in the Philadelphia area in April, 2012.rnrnHow to play Powerball: Players pay $2 and select five white balls from the first set of 69 numbers plus a single red ball, the Powerball, from a second set of 26 numbers. Players may select their own numbers using a Powerball playslip, or they may opt for computer-selected quick picks. Players must match all five numbers drawn plus the Powerball number to win the jackpot. There also are eight additional ways for players to win a cash prize.rnrnPurchasing the $1 Power Play option allows a winner to increase lower-tier prizes by a factor of 2, 3, 4 or 5, depending on the Power Play number drawn. A 10X multiplier will be available for the Match 4+1 prize and lower prize tiers when the jackpot is at or below $150 million, or when announced. The jackpot and the Match 5 prize are not multiplied. The Match 5 prize with the Power Play option is worth $2 million. It is $1 million without Power Play.rnrnPowerball is sold in 44 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In Pennsylvania, tickets are sold until 9:59 p.m. on drawing nights, Wednesday and Saturday.rnrnAbout the Pennsylvania Lottery: The Pennsylvania Lottery remains the only state lottery that designates all its proceeds to programs that benefit older residents. Since its inception in 1971, the Pennsylvania Lottery has contributed more than $25.8 billion to programs that include property tax and rent rebates; free transit and reduced-fare shared rides; the low-cost prescription drug programs PACE and PACENET; long-term living services; and the 52 Area Agencies on Aging, including full- and part-time senior centers throughout the state.rnrnThe Pennsylvania Lottery reminds players to check every ticket, every time. Players must be 18 or older. Please play responsibly. For help with a gambling problem, call 1-800-848-1880.rnrnFor drawings results, winning numbers, winners' stories and to subscribe to the Lottery's RSS news feed, visit www.palottery.com. Like us on Facebook at or follow us at www.twitter.com/palottery. rnrnMEDIA CONTACT: Lottery Public Relations, 717-702-8008rnrn rnrnSOURCE Pennsylvania Lottery

Giải Thưởng Lô Ðộc Ðắc Powerball Lên Kỷ Lục 1 Tỷ 300 Triệu Đồng Đô La Mỹ Sau Không Ai Trúng Trong Thứ Bảy Ngày 9 Tháng 1 Năm 2016

SOURCE: Pennsylvania LotteryrnrnPowerball at Record $1.3 Billion Jackpot after Jan. 9 Drawing Produces Many Winners in PennsylvaniarnrnMIDDLETOWN, Pa., Jan. 11, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Before rolling to a world record $1.3 billion jackpot on Saturday, Powerball® produced hundreds of thousands of winners across Pennsylvania – including a $1 million winner, seven winners of $150,000, numerous $50,000 winners and many more.rnrnThe $1 million winning ticket matched the five white balls drawn, 16-19-32-34-57, but not the red Powerball 13, to win a prize of $1 million less 25 percent federal withholding. The retailer, Wilson's Check Cashing, 1201 E. Susquehanna Ave., Philadelphia, earns a selling bonus of $5,000.rnrnSeven winning Powerball tickets sold in Pennsylvania matched 4 of 5 numbers drawn plus the Powerball, and purchased Power Play, each receiving $150,000. Those tickets were sold at the following retailers, which will each receive a $500 selling bonus:rnrnGet Go, 3029 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, Allegheny CountyrnWegmans Food Market, 5028 W. Ridge Road, EriernRutters, 6837 Lincoln Way East, Fayetteville, Franklin CountyrnAl's Quick Shop, 1172 E. Drinker St., Dunmore, Lackawanna Countyrn220 Pit Stop, 4997 Route 220, Hughesville, Lycoming CountyrnThe Point Store, 5867 U.S. Highway 522, McClure, Mifflin CountyrnTurkey Hill, 1638 Centre St., Ashland, Schuylkill CountyrnIn total, more than 914,600 Pennsylvania Lottery Powerball tickets won prizes of various amounts in the January 9 drawing, including 157,205 tickets purchased with the Power Play option that multiplied their prizes by three. See the full January 9 payout listing at palottery.com.rnrnPlayers are reminded to check every ticket, every time. In Pennsylvania, winners have one year from the drawing date to claim their prizes. Winners cannot be identified until prizes are claimed and tickets are validated.rnrn"Congratulations to all our winners in Saturday's Powerball drawing," said Pennsylvania Lottery Executive Director Drew Svitko. "As we get ready for Wednesday's drawing, we want to remind players to please play responsibly because it only takes one ticket to win."rnrnThis jackpot has been rolling since the November 4, 2015, drawing. Since then, in Pennsylvania alone, Powerball has produced a total of more than 2.1 million winners of over $22 million in prizes, including one $2 million winner and three $1 million winners.rnrnSvitko noted that the jackpot run has been good for Powerball players and also the older Pennsylvanians who benefit from Lottery proceeds. Last year, the Pennsylvania Lottery generated over $1 billion to support benefit programs for older adults. rnrnIf Wednesday's jackpot is won by a Pennsylvania player, it would become the state's 20th multi-state jackpot win. The Pennsylvania Lottery has sold 17 jackpot-winning Powerball tickets and two jackpot-winning Mega Millions tickets.rnrnThe largest Powerball prize Pennsylvania has ever awarded was a $110.2 million cash-value jackpot claimed by a New Jersey couple in May, 2004. The state's largest Powerball group win was a $107.5 million cash jackpot shared by 48 transit workers in the Philadelphia area in April, 2012.rnrnThe Powerball jackpot for the Wednesday, January 13, drawing has an annuity value of $1.3 billion or a cash value of $806 million. rnrnHow to play Powerball: Players pay $2 and select five white balls from the first set of 69 numbers plus a single red ball, the Powerball, from a second set of 26 numbers. Players may select their own numbers using a Powerball playslip, or they may opt for computer-selected quick picks. Players must match all five numbers drawn plus the Powerball number to win the jackpot. There also are eight additional ways for players to win a cash prize.rnrnPurchasing the $1 Power Play option allows a winner to increase lower-tier prizes by a factor of 2, 3, 4 or 5, depending on the Power Play number drawn. A 10X multiplier will be available for the Match 4+1 prize and lower prize tiers when the jackpot is at or below $150 million, or when announced. The jackpot and the Match 5 prize are not multiplied. The Match 5 prize with the Power Play option is worth $2 million. It is $1 million without Power Play.rnrnPowerball is sold in 44 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In Pennsylvania, tickets are sold until 9:59 p.m. on drawing nights, Wednesday and Saturday.rnrnAbout the Pennsylvania Lottery: The Pennsylvania Lottery remains the only state lottery that designates all its proceeds to programs that benefit older residents. Since its inception in 1971, the Pennsylvania Lottery has contributed more than $25.8 billion to programs that include property tax and rent rebates; free transit and reduced-fare shared rides; the low-cost prescription drug programs PACE and PACENET; long-term living services; and the 52 Area Agencies on Aging, including full- and part-time senior centers throughout the state.rnrnThe Pennsylvania Lottery reminds players to check every ticket, every time. Players must be 18 or older. Please play responsibly. For help with a gambling problem, call 1-800-848-1880.rnrnFor drawings results, winning numbers, winners' stories and to subscribe to the Lottery's RSS news feed, visit www.palottery.com. Like us on Facebook at or follow us at www.twitter.com/palottery. rnrnMEDIA CONTACT: Lottery Public Relations, 717-702-8008rnrn rnrnSOURCE Pennsylvania LotteryrnrnrnrnRELATED LINKSrnhttp://www.palottery.com

What’s In The Old City Neighborhood?

Restaurants, Shops, Bars, Cafes, Galleries & Theaters In Historic Philadelphia’s Old Cityrn

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rnLocated just next to Independence Mall, where the country’s Founding Fathers declared liberty and built a free nation, Old City still boasts charming cobblestone streets and plenty of 18th-century charm—along with an independent streak that’s evident in everything from its owner-operated shops to its edgy art scene.rnrnIts proximity to the Liberty Bell, Penn’s Landing and the Benjamin Franklin Bridge make Old City a favorite for out-of-towners as much as for the residents who call it home. People love the neighborhood for its fashionable boutiques, great restaurants, eclectic galleries, boundary-pushing theaters and vibrant nightlife. Especially popular are First Fridays, when art lovers fill the streets for gallery hopping.rnrnOld City boundaries stretch from the Delaware River to 6th Street and from Walnut to Race streets. It’s located within an easy walk or cab ride for those in Center City, and SEPTA’s Market-Frankford line (“the El” to residents) stops along Market Street at 2nd and 5th streets.rnrnNeighborhood tips, itineraries and maps are available at visitphilly.com/neighborhoods.rnrnRestaurants & Bars:rnrn2nd Story Brewing – A local farmer teamed up with her son-in-law, a brewer, to open this working brewery, restaurant and bar. The menu includes fish and chips, burgers and house-made pizzas, with plenty of healthy options in the mix as well. 117 Chestnut Street, (267) 314-5770, 2ndstorybrewing.comrnAmada – The restaurant that many consider responsible for starting the tapas trend in the city—and Jose Garces’ first Philly venture—also serves big Spanish-style plates, including a roasted suckling pig. Can’t decide what to have for dinner? Choose one of the chef’s tasting options with or without the wine pairing. 217-219 Chestnut Street, (215) 625-2450, amadarestaurant.comrnAriana – This family-owned bring-your-own-bottle (BYOB) restaurant was the first to serve traditional Afghani food in the region and one of the first to introduce hookahs to the city. Guests rave about the kabobs and the Afghan pudding desserts. 134 Chestnut Street, (215) 922-1535, restaurantariana.comrnBarra Italian Restaurant – With both a late-night menu and private dining options, this small, modern cafe makes a great choice for date night or a business dinner. Daily dinner specials and the everyday $10 burger-and-beer special turn first-timers into regulars. 239 Chestnut Street, (215) 238-6900, barraphilly.comrnBierstube German Tavern – Classic German dishes pair with several hundred craft and imported beers, courtesy of Michael Naessens, one of the neighborhood’s staunchest and earliest advocates for quality suds. The two-floor restaurant takes pride in matching outstanding beers with outstanding German cuisine. 206 Market Street, (215) 922-2958, mybierstube.comrnBistro 7 – Local, organic foods are central to this white-linen French bistro-style BYOB, where the menu changes with the seasons. For $35, diners can enjoy a three-course tasting menu (offered Tuesday and Thursday). 7 N. 3rd Street, (215) 931-1560, bistro7restaurant.comrnBuddakan – Stephen Starr’s original temple of modern Asian cuisine offers creative takes on Japanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai and Indian fare in a theatrical setting. During lunch, diners can enjoy bento box specials for $15 or $20. 325 Chestnut Street, (215) 574-9440, buddakan.comrnBuffalo Billiards – This downtown pool hall welcomes sports-loving crowds with its flat screens, dartboards and casual fare. In addition to pool and darts, visitors play shuffleboard, skeeball, foosball and more. 118 Chestnut Street, (215) 574-7665, buffalobilliards.comrnCapofitto – The crew behind Philadelphia’s beloved gelato mini-chain, Capogiro, wows with their Neapolitan-style pizza from a custom wood-fired oven. Weekend brunch features pasta, egg dishes and pizza, of course. 233 Chestnut Street, (215) 897-9999, capofittoforno.comrnChloe – This tiny BYOB serves New American cuisine with innovative flair in a comfortable, neighborhood setting. The restaurant maintains a no-reservations policy, so in-the-know diners arrive early to secure a table without a wait. 232 Arch Street, (215) 629-2337, chloebyob.comrnCity Tavern – Revolutionary renditions of 18th-century Colonial fine dining include George Washington’s original recipe for ale. Costumed servers add to the charm. 138 S. 2nd Street, rn(215) 413-1443, citytavern.comrnThe Continental Restaurant and Martini Bar – Old City’s original martini bar, the Continental specializes in global tapas served in a lively, stylish setting. The kitchen stays open late on Fridays and Saturdays to satisfy the cravings of the neighborhood’s party people. 138 Market Street, (215) 923-6069, continentalmartinibar.comrnCuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar – Cuban and Latin cuisine and refreshing mojitos fit perfectly in this setting straight out of old Havana. Helmed by two-time James Beard Award-winner Guillermo Pernot, the kitchen offers the “15 Tastes of Cuba” tasting menu nightly and an unlimited tapas brunch on weekends. 10 S. 2nd Street, (215) 627-0666, cubalibrerestaurant.comrnDiNardo’s Famous Seafood – A Philadelphia seafood institution for nearly four decades, DiNardo’s gets crabs flown in daily from the Gulf Coast and serves them hot and dirty Baltimore-style or with garlic. They also prepare seafood specialties, steaks, pasta and chicken dishes. 312 Race Street, (215) 925-5115, dinardos.comrnDrinker’s Tavern – Young partiers drink 40-ounce bottles and dance to DJs in a loud and always-lively scene. When hunger strikes, they chow on classic pub grub, such as fries topped with bacon and cheddar or spicy buffalo sauce and melted jack and cheddar cheeses. 124 Market Street, (215) 351-0141, drinkersphilly.comrnEulogy Belgian Tavern – A beer haven, Eulogy pours more than 400 choices, including 30 on tap. The tasty menu of Belgian specialties pairs perfectly with the libations and the vibe. rn136 Chestnut Street, (215) 413-1918, eulogybar.comrnFarmicia – The staff serves tasty food and beverages created from local and organic products in a relaxed yet lively environment. The half-priced happy hour specials make it an after-work destination. 15 S. 3rd Street, (215) 627-6274, farmiciarestaurant.comrnFork – Owner Ellen Yin’s elegant American bistro jumpstarted the restaurant scene in Old City more than 15 years ago, and it remains a highlight in the neighborhood and the city. Seasonal ingredients make up the seemingly simple yet fabulous dishes. 306 Market Street, rn(215) 625-9425, forkrestaurant.comrnThe Gaslight – This bar and restaurant from Top Chef alum Jason Cichonski features interesting takes on the classics (think Kung Pao spare ribs). Cleverly named drinks and daylong brunch keep the fun going all weekend. 120 Market Street, (215) 925-7695, thegaslightphilly.comrnHan Dynasty – With accolades from CNN and Anthony Bourdain, this contemporary Chinese restaurant puts a twist on the classics. Diners choose their spice level, numbered 1-10. 123 Chestnut Street, (215) 922-1888, handynasty.netrnHigh Street on Market – Fork’s sister restaurant, High Street serves three meals a day. Morning means egg sandwiches, sweet and savory pastries and Rival Bros. small-batch coffee. Lunch brings sandwiches, market salads and artisan breads. And dinner is a sophisticated but casual affair complete with handmade and house-extruded pastas, family-style plates and a concise list of wines and spirits. 308 Market Street, (215) 625-0988, highstreetonmarket.comrnIndependence Beer Garden – Nothing celebrates freedom quite like enjoying a cold one outside, and that’s why this beer garden is an American classic. Michael Schulson’s seasonal 22,000-square-foot Old City getaway boasts 50 taps and seven cans, plus a menu of comfort-food bites (spicy shrimp rolls, beer-battered fish and chips and mac and cheese). rn100 S. Independence Mall West, (215) 922-7100, phlbeergarden.comrnIrish Pōl – With 40 craft beers on tap, this bar has established itself as a must-visit spot for beer lovers. On Monday nights, the Irish Pōl plays nothing but Pearl Jam, and fans sporting the band’s gear get a discount on their bar bill. 114 Market Street, (267) 761-9532, theirishpol.comrnKhyber Pass Pub – Known for its bacon-grease popcorn and New Orleans-style brunch, the Khyber offers an intimate experience in a friendly, no-frills setting. But don’t let the popcorn scare the non-meat eaters in the bunch; the menu also features a number of vegan and vegetarian options. 56 S. 2nd Street, (215) 238-5888, khyberpasspub.comrnLa Peg – Diners at this brasserie, which is located inside the FringeArts building, enjoy French-inspired dishes from Peter Woolsey and waterfront views. The industrial-chic design pays homage to the building’s original purpose as a pumping station. 140 N. Columbus Boulevard, (215) 375-7744, lapegbrasserie.comrnLucha Cartel – A Mexican bar and restaurant by the same team behind National Mechanics, Lucha Cartel features Tex-Mex appetizers and entrees, as well as Latin-inspired beverage favorites like mojitos and margaritas. Tuesday nights feature introductory salsa lessons. 207 Chestnut Street, (267) 761-9209, luchacartel.comrnMac’s Tavern – The producers and actors of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia are behind this straightforward bar and restaurant, which serves a staggeringly large selection of draught and bottled beers from around the world. Patrons wash down Sunday brunch with $5 Bloody Mary and mimosa pints until 3:00 p.m. 226 Market Street, (267) 324-5507, macstavern.comrnMorgan’s Pier – Just below the Ben Franklin Bridge, leafy trees, a gourmet picnic menu and a beer garden unite at this seasonal dining destination. Earlier in the evening, people enjoy brews and food during sunset, and later on, they listen to live music or DJs while taking in the waterfront view. 221 N. Columbus Boulevard, (215) 279-7134, morganspier.comrnMoshulu – The breathtaking views keep diners coming back for twilight cocktails and delicious fare aboard this fully restored four-masted sailing ship, berthed on Penn’s Landing. rn401 S. Columbus Boulevard, (215) 923-2500, moshulu.comrnNational Mechanics – At this darkly stylish indie bar, housed in a former bank building, the crowd is hip and the craft beers flow. What’s more, the food is pretty impressive. Tip: Those are notable Philly personalities etched on the pint glasses. 22 S. 3rd Street, (215) 701-4883, nationalmechanics.comrnThe Plough & the Stars – This friendly spot offers well-executed American fare, a bustling bar that draws a young weekend crowd and live traditional Irish music on Sundays. If it’s nice out, patrons gravitate to the outdoor tables. 123 Chestnut Street, (215) 733-0300, ploughstars.comrnPositano Coast – Diners transport to Italy’s Amalfi Coast at this restaurant and wine bar. Favorites of the Mediterranean menu include the sea urchin pasta, pan-seared branzino, gnocchi gorgonzola and, of course, grilled octopus. 212 Walnut Street, (215) 238-0499, positanocoast.netrnPrime Stache – Owned by Eagles’ tight end Brent Celek, this American bistro serves burgers, a pulled-pork sandwich (named after Ron Burgundy) and veggie wraps, as well as larger entrees such as meatloaf and cedar-plank salmon. Don’t expect to find signed jerseys or football memorabilia surrounding the marble-topped bar—though patrons may see the owner there during the off-season. 110 Chestnut Street, (267) 886-8354, primestache.comrnRace Street Café – Settle into this low-key rustic bistro, warmed in the winter by a wood stove and cooled in the summer by the breeze blowing through the open barn doors. The menu features seasonal, local food. 208 Race Street, (215) 627-6181, racestreetcafe.netrnRadicchio Café – Wonderful rustic Italian cuisine and seafood make up the specialties at this fresh BYOB restaurant, situated on the outskirts of the neighborhood. Open seven days a week for dinner, it’s the perfect place to check out on a Monday night when many other restaurants are closed. 314 York Avenue, (215) 627-6850, radicchio-cafe.comrnRed Owl Tavern – This tavern attached to the Hotel Monaco Philadelphia serves up handcrafted cocktails made with fresh-squeezed juices, along with house-cured charcuterie and classic dishes with an international twist. On weekends, brunchers enjoy a self-serve Bellini bar. 433 Chestnut Street, (215) 923-2267, redowltavern.comrnRevolution House – Serving lunch, dinner and weekend brunch, this two-floor spot offers prime views of the Christ Church steeple and Benjamin Franklin Bridge, along with a playful menu of internationally influenced comfort food and Neapolitan pizza. The bar pours eight rotating local beers, cocktails and boutique wines. 200 Market Street, (215) 625-4566, revolutionhouse.comrnPanorama – One of the most romantic Italian restaurants in Philadelphia, this gem boasts a Guinness World Record for its extensive wine-by-the-glass selection. Specialties include Gnocchi Con Provola Affumicata—that’s homemade potato and ricotta gnocchi with fresh basil and smoked mozzarella in a light San Marzano tomato sauce. 14 N. Front Street, (215) 922-7800, panoramaristorante.comrnRocchino’s – Brick walls, a curved bar, a coal-fired oven and booth seating complement this restaurant’s old-school Italian menu. Chef Joe Nocella dipped into family recipe books to bring diners such delights as rigatoni bolognese and risotto di mare. 239 Chestnut Street, rn(215) 238-6900, rocchinos.comrnSassafras – Serving Philadelphians for more than 35 years, this Old City classic offers a small but eclectic menu, along with a serious selection of single-malt scotches, whiskeys and bourbons. Not to be missed: A live jazz trio performs most Sunday through Thursday nights. 48 S. 2nd Street, (215) 925-2317, sassafrasbar.comrnThe Victoria Freehouse – The Victoria Freehouse delivers a real British experience with pub snacks, curries and a Sunday Roast. Diners wash it all down with a large assortment of wines and brews while watching a soccer match. 10 S. Front Street, (215) 543-6089, victoriafreehouse.comrnWedge + Fig – Cheese lovers revel in the global selections at this small bistro. Guests who bring their own beer or wine can tap into the pairing expertise of the staff. When the weather is nice, people love to sit outside in the courtyard. 160 N. 3rd Street, (267) 603-3090, wedgeandfig.comrnXi’an Cuisine and Bar – This three-story spot is a bar, restaurant and karaoke lounge in one. Aspiring singers fill up on Chinese comfort cuisine and cocktails before venturing into private karaoke rooms on the third level. 120 Chestnut Street, (215) 627-1688, xiancuisine.comrnZahav – Michael Solomonov, a James Beard Award winner, cooks food from his native Israel in his adopted home of Philadelphia. Diners can choose from a selection of raved-about hummus options, share a few small plates or order from the $45 tasting menu. 237 St. James Place, (215) 625-8800, zahavrestaurant.comrnZento Contemporary Japanese Cuisine – Chef/owner Sam Ho brings finesse and creativity to this top-shelf sushi and sake bar. Don’t miss the specialty Old City Roll with shrimp tempura topped with eel and avocado. 132 Chestnut Street, (215) 925-9998, zentocontemporary.comrnTea, Coffee & Confections:rnrnCafé Ole – Free Wi-Fi, fragrant java and friendly staff define this neighborhood coffee shop. The pet-friendly café even serves breakfast, lunch and pastries. 147 N. 3rd Street, (215) 627-2140rnEuropean Republic – Guests munch on European-style wraps and Belgian-style frites with rn20 different toppings while sipping on fresh-roasted coffee at this cozy coffee shop and cafe. rn213 Chestnut Street, (215) 627-5500rnThe Franklin Fountain – This old-fashioned ice cream saloon tempts people of all ages with its handmade ice cream, banana splits, thick shakes, sundaes and flavored soda water—all served by soda jerks. During the cold winter months, people line up for hot chocolate or a slice of fresh baked pie. Or both. 116 Market Street, (215) 627-1899, franklinfountain.comrnOld City Coffee – Roasting 100% Arabica coffee since 1985, this friendly spot on cobblestone Church Street also serves pastries and locally sourced organic yogurt. Old City roasts its beans in small batches to ensure freshness. 221 Church Street, (215) 629-9292, oldcitycoffee.comrnShane Candies – Owned and operated for 99 years by the Shane Family, Shane Candies is now under the ownership of the duo behind The Franklin Fountain. All of the handcrafted candy contains 10 ingredients or less, and they’re all locally sourced. 110 Market Street, rn(215) 922-1048, shanecandies.comrnSwiss Haus Bakery – This Philadelphia institution uses century-old European recipes to make its 30 cookie choices, custom cakes and handmade pastries. Guests can stop in to have some coffee, or order online to get the goods shipped. 313 Market Street, (267) 457-3262, swisshausbakery.comrnTartes Fine Cakes and Pastries – Neighbors with a sweet tooth know to head here for their daily supply of cupcakes, cookies, cakes and, of course, tarts. 212 Arch Street, rn(215) 625-2510rnClubs & Entertainment:rnrnBleu Martini – This restaurant, bar and club bathed in cobalt blue offers a VIP scene and an edgy DJ soundtrack. Daily happy hour specials run from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m. and include $5 select martinis from the 30 martinis on the menu. 24 S. 2nd Street, (215) 940-7900, bleumartiniphilly.comrnRed Sky – An upscale bar menu and a variety of specialty cocktails draw a young and affluent crowd. DJs spin most nights, and the kitchen remains open as long as the DJ is going. 224 Market Street, (215) 925-8080 redskybar.comrnStratus Lounge – Eleven stories above the city’s most historical treasures, party people dance to the sounds of DJ-spun music every Friday and Saturday nights at this posh spot. Open year-round, this rooftop favorite serves light bites to complement the signature drink list. 433 Chestnut Street, (215) 925-2889, stratuslounge.comrnTin Angel – National and local acoustic singer-songwriters take the stage Wednesday through Sunday nights in an intimate cafe setting. Serrano, the venue’s restaurant arm, serves international comfort food. 20 S. 2nd Street, (215) 928-0978, tinangel.comrnShops:rnrnThe A List Look – This contemporary women’s apparel boutique carries both national and local designers. The store even hosts First Friday events, such as acoustic shows and locally made fruit tastings. 228 Arch Street, (215) 309-2275, thealistlook.comrnArt In The Age of Mechanical Reproduction – At this stylish boutique and gallery space, shoppers find quality curated clothing, local vendors, bar accessories and apothecary products, as well as home design items. It’s also the retail spot for Warby Parker glasses and a tasting room for Art in the Age spirits: Snap (as in ginger), Root (beer), Rhubarb and Sage. 116 N. 3rd Street, (215) 922-2600, artintheage.comrnBonejour Pet Supply – Specializing in health and wellness products, pets and their owners shop here for all-natural items, food consulting and top-notch independent food brands. The do-it-yourself dog wash supplies a tub, sprayer, shampoos, conditioners, spritzes, brushes, clippers, towels and a dryer. 53 N. 3rd Street, (215) 574-1225, bonejourpetsupply.comrnThe Book Trader – Visitors can swap their own titles for store credit or just peruse the shelves for fiction of all genres and that hard-to-find LP. 7 N. 2nd Street, (215) 925-2080rnBrave New Worlds – Comic lovers find collectibles and the latest illustrated novels, comics and Japanese manga, as well as action figures, games and toys. Weekly emails alert customers about new books, and the helpful staff is happy to hold titles for those who can’t get there right away. 55 N. 2nd Street, (215) 925-6525, bravenewworldscomics.comrnBriar Vintage – Perfect for dapper gents, this men’s shop fills its racks and shelves with vintage duds, collectibles and oddities from the 1800s through the 1960s. One-of-a-kind pieces include a 1901 tailcoat from William Wanamaker (John’s brother), a 1920s three-piece suit from H. Christian Schmidt (Philadelphia beer baron/Schmidt’s Brewery), straw boater hats from the 1930s and atomic fleck sport coats from the 1950s. 62 N. 3rd Street, (215) 627-1990, briarvintage.comrnCharlie’s Jeans – This one-stop shop for designer denim exclusively carries Sebastian McCall jeans, made in the USA and known for their perfect fit. Store employees pride themselves on their ability to size up customers at first glance. 233 Market Street, (215) 923-9681, charliesjeans.netrnThe Conversion Shop – This rustic, nostalgic shop carries furnishings and home accessories that include custom-made repurposed wooden tables, benches and shelving. Vintage dressers and trunks are for sale, along with the perfect accessories to place on top of them. 38 S. 3rd StreetrnDoggie Style – This haute dog emporium sells everything dogs need to be Fido-licious, including grooming services. Cat lovers are also welcome. 315 Market Street, (215) 923-4333, doggiestylepets.comrnErdon – Fashion is an art form in this gallery-like space. The lighting is bright in order to highlight the latest designer goods from MM6, Closed and Cotelac. 162 N. 3rd Street, rn(215) 923-0300, erdon.cornThe Geisha House – Named the “Best Women’s Boutique for Brands You Don’t Know” by Philadelphia magazine, this spot does not disappoint. The dresses are trendy but wearable, and the jewelry is just funky enough. 149 N. 3rd Street, (267) 886-8110, hellogeisha.comrnLost + Found – Those who snag the indie men’s and women’s duds here get great looks at affordable prices. Accessories, jewelry and vintage pieces round out a successful shopping trip. 133 N. 3rd Street, (215) 928-1311rnMargot & Camille Optique – Life looks brighter through the lens of this optical boutique. Customers rely on high-quality and a customized approach to keep their eyewear fresh and fashionable. 47 N. 3rd Street, (215) 923-0508, margotcamille.comrnMillesime & Ligne Roset – This new location for a high-concept design showroom features collections of modern and contemporary furniture, lighting and home accessories from American and international designers. The ever-evolving merchandise includes USM modular furniture, Herman Miller, Marset, Louis Poulsen and Foscarini. 33 N. 2nd Street, (267) 455-0374, millesime.usrnMinima – This contemporary furniture and lighting collection balances form and function. The intelligent use of materials combined with inspired design creates furniture that can last a lifetime. 118 N. 3rd Street, (215) 922-2002, minima.usrnMode Moderne – The 20th-century modern décor, uber-contemporary home furnishings and accessories by Herman Miller and Modernica add dazzle to any living space. The owners also curate and sell a collection of vintage pieces. 159 N. 3rd Street, (215) 627-0299, modemoderne.comrnMomo’s Tree House – This cute and quirky shop lives up to its “toys for curious kids” tagline by offering hard-to-find, specialty toys and games. Tiny customers can test out the plush animals, scooters and train sets on display. 205 Arch Street, (267) 457-2803, momostreehouse.comrnN3rd Collections – Savvy shoppers can browse a selection of oddities from five small businesses under one roof. Vintage finds include clothing, furniture and housewares, while candles and handmade jewelry are available too. 21 N. 3rd Street, (267) 225-5814, scoutsalvage.comrnNever Too Spoiled – The place to go for the girl who already has everything, Never Too Spoiled carries clothes, jewelry, candles, accessories, housewares, books, stationery and even gifts for pets. 57 N. 3rd Street, (215) 928-0167rnPhiladelphia Independents – This all-local boutique makes gift-giving a cinch. Only handmade items by Philadelphia artists are offered here—think jewelry, handbags, home décor and baby gifts. 35 N. 3rd Street, (267) 773-7316, philadelphiaindependents.comrnPinot Boutique – This “Best of Philly” winner offers great wine, tastings and classes, private parties and more. Locals stop here for the wide selection of wines from Pennsylvania and New Jersey vineyards and accessories galore. 227 Market Street, (215) 627-WINE, pinotboutique.comrnSazz Vintage Clothing – Men tough enough to rock vintage disco clothes, western shirts, sharkskin suits and rayon Hawaiian shirts find everything they need here. Sazz keeps 1,000 pieces of (mostly) men’s vintage clothing in stock. 60 N. 3rd Street, (215) 923-7299, sazzvintage.comrnScarlett Alley – Hosts and hostesses head to Scarlett Alley when throwing dinner parties. Here they score tableware, candles and home accessories. 241 Race Street, (215) 592-7898, scarlettalley.comrnSelect Shop 215 – Brand new to the scene, this home-style boutique carries a high-end selection of adornments for the home and body. Journals, apothecary products and Brooklyn-made jewelry are just a few of the varied sections. 41. S. 3rd Street, selectshop215.comrnSmak Parlour – Take fun and flirty, and blend in a little hipster chic—that’s the look of the original designs by fashion mavens Abby Kessler and Katie Loftus. Their girl-centric boutique is so popular that it spawned a roving Fashion Truck, which hits various locations throughout the city with merchandise aplenty. 219 Market Street, (215) 625-4551, smakparlour.comrnSugarcube – A spacious store and small, coveted labels (Asbury Park Denim, Rag & Bone, Bridge & Burn, Lavender Brown, Won Hundred, Krisa) make for a well-edited men’s and women’s boutique. GQ gave its nod of approval by including Sugarcube in its Philly city guide. 124 N. 3rd Street, (215) 238-0825, sugarcube.usrnThird Street Habit – Fashion fans find their way here for edgy women’s clothes by Ulla Johnson, Mara Hoffman and Frame Denim, as well as other top runway names. It’s also the only boutique in the city featuring Isabel Marant’s L’Etoile line. 153 N. 3rd Street, (215) 925-5455, thirdstreethabit.comrnUnited By Blue – Part clothier, part coffee house, this flagship store features men’s and women’s fashions. For every product sold at the boutique, United By Blue removes one pound of trash from oceans and waterways through company-organized and -hosted cleanups. 144 N. 2nd Street, (215) 278-7746, unitedbyblue.comrnVagabond – A generous smattering of indie labels, handmade knit collections and modern designs fill the racks at Vagabond. The shop also boasts its own line of fashion-forward skirts and sweaters. 37 N. 3rd Street, (267) 671-0737, vagabondboutique.comrnGalleries:rnrnThe Center for Art in Wood – The center shines a spotlight on bold works in lathe-turned wood by locally and internationally known artists. The permanent collection contains 1,000 objects from around the world, ranging from functional everyday pieces to contemporary sculpture. 141 N. 3rd Street, (215) 923-8000, centerforartinwood.org The Clay Studio – Dedicated to active learning, this non-profit studio and gallery offers ceramic classes for all ages and levels, outreach programs, studio space and engaging contemporary ceramics exhibitions. It’s also a good place to find handmade gifts. 137-139 N. 2nd Street, rn(215) 925-3453, theclaystudio.orgrnModerne Gallery – The works of George Nakashima and Wharton Esherick—internationally renowned for their 20th-century furniture, lighting and accessories—and an extensive inventory of French and American Art Deco fill five floors of space. 111 N. 3rd Street, (215) 923-8536, modernegallery.comrnMuse Gallery – This artist-run gallery highlights visual arts in mixed media, ranging from painting to photography to sculpture. Group and individual shows fill the calendar. rn52 N. 2nd Street, (215) 627-5310, musegalleryphiladelphia.comrnPII Gallery – The curator of PII (Philadelphia International Institute) rounds up works in all media by some of the most innovative emerging international artists working in textile design, printmaking, painting, sculpture and photography. The gallery premieres a new exhibit on the first Friday of every month. 242 Race Street, (215) 592-1022, piigallery.comrnRodger LaPelle Galleries – Visitors to this spacious gallery enjoy contemporary work ranging from abstract drawings to realistic paintings. Informative and entertaining owner Rodger LaPelle has been a fixture in the art world for decades. 122 N. 3rd Street, (215) 592-0232, rodgerlapellegalleries.comrnThe Snyderman-Works Galleries – A fixture on the Philly art scene for half a century, this gallery spotlights contemporary studio crafts in ceramics, glass, jewelry, wood and fiber. rn303 Cherry Street, (215) 238-9576, snyderman-works.comrnWexler Gallery – The accomplished team at Wexler believes in challenging the traditional labels that categorize art. As such, contemporary glass, studio furniture, ceramics and decorative arts coexist happily here. 201 N. 3rd Street, (215) 923-7030, wexlergallery.comrnPerforming Arts & Theaters:rnrnArden Theatre Company – Noted for its premier productions, new plays and popular works, the Arden presents a mainstage series for adults, as well as productions for children each season. The theater has received numerous awards, including nine “Best of Philly” awards from Philadelphia magazine. The Arden 40 N. 2nd Street, (215) 922-1122, ardentheatre.orgrnFringeArts – This 232-seat theater (with retractable seating) hosts concerts, theater performances and other events throughout the year. The onsite restaurant, La Peg, makes the dinner-and-a-show date easy. 140 N. Columbus Boulevard, (215) 413-1318, fringearts.comrnPainted Bride Arts Center – Connoisseurs of all art forms regard this as an important center for innovative, edgy and experimental music, art, dance, poetry and other performing arts. The Community Table features community-curated events ranging in topics. 230 Vine Street, (215) 925-9914, paintedbride.orgrnPenn’s Landing Playhouse – This 500-seat theater offers Philadelphia-area theatergoers another great option for enjoying the performing arts. The playhouse is located inside the Independence Seaport Museum. 211 S. Columbus Boulevard, (855) 448-7469, plplayhouse.comrnRitz Theaters – Fans of indie and international films pack the Ritz’s three Old City locations for eclectic flicks. Every Friday night at midnight, the Ritz at the Bourse plays cult classics, such as The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Mean Girls and Die Hard. Ritz East, 125 S. 2nd Street, (215) 925-4535; Ritz Five, 214 Walnut Street, (215) 440-1184; Ritz at the Bourse, rn400 Ranstead Street, (215) 440-1181, landmarktheatres.comrnMuseums, History & Culture:rnrnThe African American Museum in Philadelphia – Visitors take a fresh and bold look at the stories of African-Americans through technology, photographs, videos and artifacts on display in the permanent Audacious Freedom exhibition. 701 Arch Street, (215) 574-0380, aampmuseum.orgrnBenjamin Franklin Museum – At Franklin Court, a revamped museum features artifacts and interactive exhibits that chronicle the inventor’s life as a citizen and statesman. Before entering the museum, they can explore the Ghost House in the courtyard. Market or Chestnut Streets between 3rd and 4th Streets, (215) 965-2305, nps.gov/indernBetsy Ross House – America’s most famous flag maker greets guests in her interactive 18th-century upholstery shop. Visitors learn about Betsy’s life and legend from the lady herself. Summer brings a weeklong, annual Flag Fest celebration with free events daily. Also, every morning at 10:00 a.m. in the summer, kids can participate in a free flag-raising event with Betsy and a Colonial friend. 239 Arch Street, (215) 629-4026, historicphiladelphia.orgrnChemical Heritage Foundation – A library, museum and center for scholars, the Chemical Heritage Foundation fosters dialogue on science and technology in society. Its collections include rare books, fine art, artifacts and instruments related to science and technology. rn315 Chestnut Street, (215) 925-2222, chemheritage.orgrnHistoric Philadelphia Center – Inside the Historic Philadelphia Center, visitors to the area can find information and purchase tickets for Historic Philadelphia, Inc.’s tours and attractions, such as the Betsy Ross House and Independence After Hours. Plus, they can catch the Liberty 360 3D Show, which uses the most modern technology of its kind to spotlight the most treasured American value—liberty. 6th & Chestnut Streets, (215) 629-4026, historicphiladelphia.orgrnIndependence National Historical Park (INHP) – The Liberty Bell Center, Independence Hall, Congress Hall, New Hall Military Museum, Bishop White House and Declaration House are just some of the sites that make up INHP. In the summer months, the park offers Ranger-led walking tours. (215) 965-2305, nps.gov/indernNational Constitution Center – Dedicated to the four most powerful pages in America’s history, the National Constitution Center is the only museum of the U.S. Constitution. Museumgoers explore exhibits and artifacts, take in the theatrical production Freedom Rising and walk among the 42 life-size, bronze statues of the Founding Fathers. 525 Arch Street, (215) 409-6700, constitutioncenter.orgrnNational Museum of American Jewish History – On Independence Mall, this modern museum delves into the story and impact of Jewish people in the U.S., from early settlers to history-makers such as Albert Einstein, industry giants like Esteé Lauder and artists and entertainers including Stephen Spielberg, Irving Berlin and Jerry Seinfeld. Four floors of artifacts, memorabilia and artwork tell the narrative. 101 S. Independence Mall East, (215) 923-3811, nmajh.orgrnGreen Space:rnrnBlue Cross RiverRink Winterfest – This seasonal garden and village features an open-air Olympic-size skating rink, a cozy lodge with fireplaces, festive landscaping and a light show, plus a shop, music, food, fire pits, arcade games and beverages of the adult, hot or normal variety. Activities inside and outside of the lodge fill the winter calendar. 101 S. Columbus Boulevard (Columbus Boulevard & Chestnut Street), (215) 925-RINK, waterfrontwinterfest.comrnFranklin Square – One of William Penn’s original five squares, Franklin Square is now a fun family park, with a Philly-themed miniature golf course, a restored marble fountain, playgrounds and an old-fashioned carousel starring some famous Philly horses. When hunger strikes, SquareBurger delivers with burgers, fries and shakes. 200 N. 6th Street, (215) 629-4026, historicphiladelphia.orgrnRace Street Pier – In the shadow of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge, Race Street Pier juts out into the Delaware River. The landscaped park provides two levels for recreation: The upper promenade is paved with a sustainable, synthetic decking material fashioned from reclaimed plastic, and wood is connected to the grassy lower terrace by a multi-tiered seating area that’s perfect for picnicking and watching the tide roll in. Columbus Boulevard at Race Street, (215) 922-2FUN, racestreetpier.comrnSpruce Street Harbor Park – Named one of the “World’s Best Urban Beaches” by The Huffington Post, this pop-up experience features hammocks, magical lights, games, floating barges, food, drinks and a carnival-like atmosphere. People of all ages and backgrounds gather on the Delaware River Waterfront to soak up the summertime fun. Columbus Boulevard & Spruce Street, (215) 922-2FUN, sprucestreetharborpark.comrn rnVISIT PHILADELPHIA® makes Philadelphia and The Countryside® a premier destination through marketing and image building that increases the number of visitors, the number of nights they stay and the number of things they do in the five-county area.rnrnOn Greater Philadelphia’s official visitor website and blog, visitphilly.com and uwishunu.com, visitors can explore things to do, upcoming events, themed itineraries and hotel packages. Compelling photography and videos, interactive maps and detailed visitor information make the sites effective trip-planning tools. Along with Visit Philly social media channels, the online platforms communicate directly with consumers. Travelers can also call and stop into the Independence Visitor Center for additional information and tickets.rnrnrn rnrnContact(s):rnDonna Schorr, (215) 599-0782

Holidays In Philadelphia Mean New Celebrations & Can’t-Miss Classics

The Mummers Add A New Division To Their New Year’s Day Paradern

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rnThe holidays are all about tradition, especially in Philadelphia where each year generations of visitors gather at Macy’s for the Christmas Light Show, snap memory-making photos of Longwood Gardens’ elaborate displays and oooh-and-aaaah at the New Year’s Eve Fireworks on the Waterfront. This year, the Mummers Parade, Philadelphia’s oldest and proudly quirkiest New Year’s Day tradition, gets a new look with the addition of a new division—the first since 1978. Joining the Comic, Fancy, Wench, String Band and Fancy Brigades on the march along Broad Street will be the Philadelphia division, which includes costumed marchers from the city’s numerous ethnic and immigrant groups.rnrnHere’s a look at the many holiday happenings taking place in Philly this year:rnrnLovely Lights, Jaw-Dropping Displays & High-Tech Shows:rnrnThe holiday magic at Ben Franklin’s namesake park comes in the form of the Franklin Square Holiday Festival featuring Electrical Spectacle: A Holiday Light Show. The show runs every 30 minutes between 4:30 and 8 p.m., weather permitting, and showcases a giant lighted kite and 50,000 lights choreographed to holiday music. Other festivities include visits from Santa, rides on the holiday train and carousel, seasonal treats at Ben’s Bites & Brews and even mini-golf with warming stations. November 12-December 31 (except Thanksgiving and Christmas). 6th & Race Streets, (215) 629-4026, historicphiladelphia.orgrnPeddler’s Village throws the switch on the holidays as tens of thousands of lights glimmer during the Grand Illumination Celebration on November 20. Then throughout the holiday shopping season, visitors can check out the annual Gingerbread Competition & Display. Participants compete in a variety of categories, including traditional and authentic reproductions of significant buildings. During the season, visitors also enjoy free weekend activities, including visits with Santa at Giggleberry Fair and other special events. November 20-January 2. Routes 202 & 263, Lahaska, (215) 794-4000, peddlersvillage.comrnAt the top of the hour, visitors gather in front of the Comcast Experience video wall, one of the world’s highest resolution LED displays, to catch the magic of The Comcast Holiday Spectacular. Throughout the free 15-minute show, dancers from the Pennsylvania Ballet move to music from The Nutcracker, a magical sleigh floats over the Philadelphia countryside and actors from the historic Walnut Street Theatre perform—all to a seasonal soundtrack presented by a 64-piece orchestra. Daily, 10 a.m-8 p.m. (except 5 p.m. on weekdays). November 24-January 3. 17th Street & John F. Kennedy Boulevard, visitphilly.comrnThe holidays go red, white and green at Longwood Gardens during A Longwood Gardens Christmas, featuring 500,000 twinkling lights, colorful fountains and beautifully adorned trees. November 26-January 10. 1001 Longwood Road, Kennett Square, (610) 388-1000, longwoodgardens.orgrnA Philadelphia tradition since 1956, the Christmas Light Show at Macy’s in Center City illuminates a large wall inside the Wanamaker building, a National Historic Landmark. People of all ages delight in the 100,000 LED lights, narration by Julie Andrews and sounds from the Wanamaker Organ. Performances take place at the top of the hour. November 27-December 31. 1300 Market Street, (215) 241-9000, wanamakerorgan.comrnSet amid the evergreens, Morris Arboretum’s Holiday Garden Railway showcases a miniature winter wonderland complete with a quarter-mile of model-train track, seven loops and tunnels, 15 rail lines and model trains that cruise past scaled replicas of historic monuments and Philadelphia landmarks adorned with thousands of twinkling lights. New this year: Friday Night Lights, providing evening viewings on select nights; advanced tickets required. November 27-January 3. 100 E. Northwestern Avenue, (215) 247-5777, morrisarboretum.orgrnThe Independence Seaport Museum’s Parade of Lights stars working vessels decked out in holiday style. Indoors, participants visit with Santa and join in holiday activities and programs before moving outside to watch lighted and decorated tugboats and other vessels float along the Delaware River. December 12. 211 S. Columbus Boulevard, (215) 413-8655, phillyseaport.orgrnAnimal Antics & Festival Fun:rnrnCome December, Linvilla Orchards’ Christmasland glimmers with seasonal delights. The farm displays animals, while the market section is stocked with holiday delights and crafts for youngsters. December 1-24. Santa pops in every Saturday and Sunday, and on select afternoons, visitors can sing along during Caroling Hayrides (December 5, 12 and 19), roast marshmallows and sip apple cider. 137 W. Knowlton Road, Media, (610) 876-7116, linvilla.comrnThousands of twinkling lights, glowing trees, gently falling snow, larger-than-life decorations rnand appearances by Scuba Santa®, Bumble the Abominable Snow Monster and Rudolph put all 8,500 sea creatures and the curious folks who visit them in a festive mood during the Adventure Aquarium Christmas Celebration. December 4-31. 1 Riverside Drive, Camden, NJ, (856) 265-3300, adventureaquarium.comrnLighting up a winter night, the Firebird Festival in Phoenixville celebrates the phoenix. After a full day of music, dancing, storytelling, crafting, parades and other arts-related activities, the festival culminates at Friendship Field with the lighting of a wooden phoenix that turns it into a real firebird bonfire. December 5. 203 Fillmore Street, Phoenixville, firebirdfestival.comrnWhat’s the season like for animals in the rainforest, in the outback and on the farm? For three weekends, the Philadelphia Zoo hosts Zoo Noël, showcasing life-size renditions of Mr. Claus as he explores his role in animal habitats around the globe. Guests warm up at the holiday hot chocolate bar, browse the Little Elves’ Gift Shop, meet Santa in the Treehouse and watch as the big man feeds some favorite zoo animals. December 5-6, 12-13, 19-20. 3400 W. Girard Avenue, (215) 243-1100, philadelphiazoo.orgrnA Historic Twist:rnrnA little history, a little beer and a lot of fun are served up when one of Historic Philadelphia’s Red Coat soldier recalls life in British-occupied Philadelphia in 1777 while guiding the over-21 crowd through four cozy pubs during the winter-themed Tippler’s Tour called Yuletide Cheers & Beers. Thursdays, November 12-December 17. Historic Philadelphia Center, 6th & Market Streets, (215) 629-5801, historicphiladelphia.orgDuring regular hours, visitors to historic Pennypacker Mills enjoy guided tours of the richly decorated mansion.rnNovember 24-January 10. In addition, on December 12, the house celebrates its vintage roots during the Victorian Christmas Open House. 5 Haldeman Road, Schwenksville, (610) 287-9349, montcopa.org/pennypackermillsrnA Brandywine Christmas takes over the Brandywine River Museum of Art with one of the largest O-gauge model railroad displays in the country, a Victorian dollhouse, rare antique dolls and thousands of Critter ornaments made from natural materials on trees throughout the museum. November 27-January 3. 1 Hoffman’s Mill Road, Chadds Ford, (610) 388-2700, brandywinemuseum.orgrnAt Pottsgrove Manor, visitors join guided Twelfth Night Tours to experience the historic mansion dressed in its traditional English holiday best. November 27-January 10. During a special one-night event on December 13, guests tour the manor by candlelight while 18th-century residents mark the Twelfth Night with music and dancing in the parlor. 100 W. King Street, Pottstown, (610) 326-4014, montcopa.org/pottsgrovemanorrnThe Fairmount Park Holiday Tours offer a glimpse into the elegant celebrations of 18th-century Philadelphia society as six of the historic mansions are decked out in holiday style. From December 3-20, visitors can embark on their own for tours of Cedar Grove, Mount Pleasant, Laurel Hill, Lemon Hill, Strawberry Mansion and Woodford Mansion. On other days, they can board a trolley for self-guided and guided tours of select houses. parkcharms.comrnHistory buffs get into the spirit of the season when they witness Washington Crossing the Delaware River, a re-enactment staged at Washington Crossing Historic Park. Two days of family-friendly colonial games, crafts and other activities accompany the re-enactments. December 13 and December 25. Routes 32 & 532, (215) 493-4076, washingtoncrossingpark.orgrnAt the National Constitution Center, aspiring colonial soldiers can join in the Military Musters, meet Revolutionary War heroes and discover how they would have fared in Washington’s army on that famous December 1776 journey across the Delaware River. Visitors can also check out the latest in 18th-century fashions during a Colonial fashion show and play traditional Colonial games. December 26-31. 525 Arch Street, (215) 409-6600, constitutioncenter.orgrnHoliday Markets:rnrnThe German Christmas Market at Byers’ Choice boasts plenty of gifts for holiday shoppers (think gingerbread houses, advent calendars, handcrafted Caroler® figurines and toys). November 1-December 31. 4355 County Line Road, Chalfont, (215) 822-6700, byerschoice.comrnWith its medieval-village type setting, Philadelphia’s German-style Christmas Village has become a favorite tradition. Here shoppers find popular Christmas gifts from Germany, including glass ornaments, music boxes, nutcrackers and more while vendors serve up hot mulled wine, gingerbread and bratwursts to keep shoppers warm and satisfied. November 21-December 27. 1500 Arch Street, philachristmas.comrnNew this year, the Made in Philadelphia Holiday Market showcases the work of local artists, crafters, confectionaries and designers. Shoppers can purchase goods from local artists like Philly Word Art, designers like Beaucycled and Saffron Creations and crafters like soap maker Mahogany Essentials and Candlemaker Accent Aroma. Also available: Philly foods galore in the form of macaroons and cannolis from T Bake Shoppe, gourmet chocolates from Tradestone Confections, flavored kettle corn from Philly Pop Kettle Corn and other favorites. November 21-December 27. 1 S. 15th Street, dilworthpark.orgrnSeason Of Shows:rnrnThe Walnut Street Theatre invites audiences to join in the laughter when the Tony Award-nominated Broadway hit A Christmas Story, The Musical makes its Philadelphia debut. Fans of Ralphie and his lovably oddball family will howl with glee when the oversized pink bunny pajamas, the longed-for Red Ryder BB gun, the “fra-gee-lee” kooky leg lamp, the world’s crankiest Santa and other icons turn up in this song-and-dance version of the quirky holiday classic film. November 10-January 10. 825 Walnut Street, (215) 574-3550, walnutstreettheatre.orgrnThe furry friends at Sesame Place spread holiday cheer during A Very Furry Christmas. With twinkling lights glittering throughout the park, young fans and their families can catch the holiday spirit at Santa’s Furry Workshop, during special Christmas shows, on new rides and during the new Neighborhood Street Party Christmas Parade. November 21-December 31. 100 Sesame Road, Langhorne, (866) GO-4-ELMO, sesameplace.comrnThe Rock School for Dance Education, one of the nation’s most renowned pre-professional ballet training programs, puts a Colonial spin on a holiday classic with its production of Nutcracker 1776. November 27-28. Merriam Theater, 250 S. Broad Street, (215) 893-1999, kimmelcenter.orgrnThere’s a special ring in the air when the Impulse Handbell Ensemble, a professional youth group, joins the 120-voice Philadelphia Gay Men’s Chorus in the Bells, Brass & The Boys holiday concert. December 3-5. Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion, 2110 Chestnut Street, (215) 731-9230, pgmc.orgrnThe Philadelphia Orchestra hits the right note for the holidays with a jam-packed calendar of special performances at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. Guests sing along to seasonal favorites during the Christmas Kids Spectacular (December 5), featuring an appearance by Santa Claus. And Messiah (December 11-13) and The Glorious Sound of Christmas (December 17-20) are longstanding holiday traditions for music lovers. Another favorite: ringing in January 1 during the New Year’s Eve Concert. Broad & Spruce Streets, (215) 790-5800, kimmelcenter.org; (215) 893-1999, philorch.orgrnA beloved tradition, the Pennsylvania Ballet presents George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™ at the Academy of Music. Audiences follow Marie and her prince through a glistening snowy forest into the land of the Sugarplum Fairy, all while enjoying the sounds of the Philadelphia Boys Choir. December 11-31. Broad & Locust Streets, (215) 893-1999, paballet.orgrnOther Seasonal Celebrations:rnrnDuring the Penn Museum’s free annual Peace Around the World, visitors follow an itinerary that leads them through the galleries as speakers share holiday traditions of their home countries. The day includes international music and dancing, children’s choirs, exotic face painting, balloon art and treats. December 5. 3260 South Street, (215) 898-4000, penn.museumrnThe holiday spirit goes beyond Christmas at the National Museum of American Jewish History, which presents Being __________at Christmas. The event invites families from every background to join in a day of music, games, dancing, children’s activities and crafts with The Clay Studio. December 25. 101 S. Independence Mall East, (215) 923-3811, nmajh.orgrnThe African American Museum in Philadelphia hosts a family-friendly Kwanzaa Celebration, with a candle-lighting ceremony, storytelling, music, crafts and other activities. People are encouraged to bring a canned good donation for Philabundance. December 26-27. 701 Arch Street, (215) 574-0380, aampmuseum.orgrnRing In The New Year:rnrnRevelers with early bedtimes can party at Franklin Square’s Kids’ New Year’s Eve Countdown, featuring a 6 p.m. “square” drop, a dance party in the pavilion and a great view of the early fireworks show at Penn’s Landing. While there, partygoers can catch the Franklin-inspired Electrical Spectacle light show (see above description). December 31. 6th & Race Streets, (215) 629-4026, historicphiladelphia.orgrnMaritime merriment abounds on New Year’s Eve when the Independence Seaport Museum stays open late for the Annual Family Fireworks Viewing Party (4-7 p.m.) on the museum’s second-floor balcony. A sparkling cider toast and panoramic views of fireworks make it a festive, family-friendly affair. December 31. 211 S. Columbus Boulevard, (215) 413-8655, phillyseaport.orgrnPenn’s Landing is the place to ring in the New Year. SugarHouse Casino’s New Year’s Eve Fireworks on the Waterfront light up the sky over the Delaware River two times—at 6 p.m. and again at midnight. Folks can lace up their ice skates for the Holiday Party on Ice at the Blue Cross RiverRink Winterfest, featuring entertainment, party favors and great views. And the festivities inside the Winterfest tent add a cozy touch to the holiday celebration. December 31. Columbus Boulevard at Market Street, (215) 925-RINK, delawareriverevents.comrnThe Mummers Parade, the only-in-Philly tradition that dates back to 1901, is welcoming a whole new group of marchers to join them as they ring in the New Year. All the feathers, sequins, music and merriment that mark the festivities will still be on display, but now, in addition to the Comics, Wenches, Fancies, Fancy Brigades and String Bands, fans can cheer on the all-new Philadelphia Division with costumed participants representing the city’s many diverse cultures and ethnic groups. The String Bands will line up on Benjamin Franklin Parkway between 16th and 18th streets; the other divisions will line up on John F. Kennedy Boulevard between 16th and 22nd streets. After the judging at City Hall, the groups leave their props behind and get down to some serious performing for the crowds as they head to Broad Street and march south to Washington Avenue. Revelers should arrive early for the best views along the parade route, but to catch the action from the judge’s stand, it’s best to purchase tickets ahead of time. Spectators can get even more Mummers glitz at the Fancy Brigade Finale competition at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, where clubs perform their Broadway-style music-and-dance routines for prizes and bragging rights. Tickets for parade bleacher seating at City Hall and for the Fancy Brigades are both available at the Independence Visitor Center, 6th & Market Streets, rn(215) 965-7676, phlvisitorcenter.com; tickets for the competition at the Convention Center are also available at (800) 298-4200, comcasttix.comrnVISIT PHILADELPHIA® makes Philadelphia and The Countryside® a premier destination through marketing and image building that increases the number of visitors, the number of nights they stay and the number of things they do in the five-county area.rnrnOn Greater Philadelphia’s official visitor website and blog, visitphilly.com and uwishunu.com, visitors can explore things to do, upcoming events, themed itineraries and hotel packages. Compelling photography and videos, interactive maps and detailed visitor information make the sites effective trip-planning tools. Along with Visit Philly social media channels, the online platforms communicate directly with consumers. Travelers can also call and stop into the Independence Visitor Center for additional information and tickets.rnrnContact(s):rnDonna Schorr, (215) 599-0782rnE-mailPrintrnShare

The Cordish Companies’ XFINITY Live! Philadelphia Unveils New Concepts And Renovated Spaces During Grand Reopening

Philadelphia Chef Jason Cichonski of Ela, The Gaslight, and Bravo TV's "Top Chef" Creates New Dining Experience with Brand New 1100 Social; Expansion has added 75 new permanent jobsrn

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rnPHILADELPHIA, Oct. 14, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Capitalizing on a highly successful first three years of operation, The Cordish Companies' XFINITY Live! Philadelphia recently completed an expansion and renovation to the dining and entertainment district. The new improvements at XFINITY Live! include:rnrn1100 Social rnTransformation of the existing Spectrum Grill into an all-new dining experience, 1100 Social is an eatery by Philadelphia Chef Jason Cichonski, owner and head chef of Ela and The Gaslight. 1100 Social is a new eatery offering shareable plates influenced by Mexican and Asian flavors. 1100 Social features new finishes, furniture and décor and includes an interior bar facing the NBC Sports Arena as well as a new outdoor patio with multiple fire pits, covered and heated intimate dining areas and lush landscaping.rnrn"Spectrum Grill has been a very successful restaurant for the district, but the ability to add Chef Cichonski with a dynamic new concept to the XFINITY Live! line-up was too good of an opportunity to pass up," said Tony Monaco, Chief Operating Officer of XFINITY Live!rnrn"I am incredibly excited to bring my commitment to high-quality and innovative cuisine to XFINITY Live!," said Cichonski. "American cuisine is a melding of many cultures and influences, and with 1100 Social, I intend to celebrate the flavors and influences that have long inspired me. I can't wait to share this exciting new concept with Philadelphia."rnrnVictory Beer Hall rnExpansion of Victory Beer Hall, with the addition of an architecturally stunning glass and steel building that opens to an exterior beer garden, outdoor seating, and fire-pit area.rnrn"Our beer hall at XFINITY Live! is a very important part of the growth of our brand, and this expansion clearly demonstrates our commitment to the City of Philadelphia and our loyal patrons," stated Steve German, Vice President of Sales and Marketing of Victory Brewing Company.rnrnGeno's Steaks rnArrival of one of Philadelphia's most famous cheesesteak stops, Geno's Steaks brings a popular addition to the already vast collection of food and drink options.rnrnGeno's Steaks is now open next to Victory Beer Hall. Patrons can order their steak with Whiz, American or provolone, and, of course, "wit or witout" onions. Geno's Steaks is located in the Philly Marketplace inside XFINITY Live!rnrn"I am very excited to be a part of XFINITY Live! To be able to bring Philadelphia's No. 1 Cheesesteak to Philadelphia's No.1 Sports Bar is great fit for the city and all of its sports fans," said Geno Vento, owner of Geno's Cheesesteaks.rnrnPBR Bar and Grill rnPBR Bar and Grill now features a brand new 3,000 sq. ft. covered patio with fire pits, TV's and an indoor/outdoor bar.rnrnA new VIP area with soft seating and lighting was added to the interior.rnrnThe Terrace rnThe Terrace, a 4,000 sq. ft. addition is the new elevated private event space adjacent to 1100 Social.rnrnThe covered open-air space features a beautiful wood teak wall accent, 9 ft. in diameter ceiling fans with views overlooking Lincoln Financial Field and Citizens Bank Park, creating the ultimate gathering space for groups and clients.rnrnExtensive enhancements to the exterior finishes, signage, lighting and landscaping creates a new and improved pedestrian experience in and around the district.rnrnWith this expansion, XFINITY Live! now boasts 52,000 sq. ft. of outdoor space. Improvements to the concert and event stage include state-of-the-art audio and visual enhancements.rnrnSeventy-five new permanent jobs were created by this expansion, including servers, hostesses, chefs, security and managers.rnrnUpcoming events to celebrate the Grand Re-Opening of XFINITY Live! include: Oktoberfest Live! (Saturday, October 17) and Nightmare on Broad Street Halloween Bash (Saturday, October 31).rnrnAbout XFINITY Live! PhiladelphiarnXFINITY Live! Philadelphia is a dining and entertainment district centered in the heart of the South Philadelphia Sports Complex. The one-of-a-kind venue features over a dozen restaurant and entertainment choices, including six main venues: Broad Street Bullies Pub, PBR Bar & Grill (Professional Bull Riders), Philly Market Place, 1100 Social, Victory Beer Hall and the first-ever NBC Sports Arena. XFINITY Live! Philadelphia is Philadelphia's No. 1 Sports Bar, as voted by Philadelphia Magazine.rnrnAbout Victory Brewing CompanyrnVictory Brewing Company is a craft brewery headquartered in Downingtown, PA. Founded by childhood friends, Bill Covaleski and Ron Barchet, Victory officially opened its doors in February of 1996. Victory serves fans fully flavored beers in 36 states with innovative beers melding European ingredients and technology with American creativity. To learn more about Victory Brewing Company visit www.victorybeer.com.rnrnAbout Chef Jason Cichonski rnChef Jason Cichonski is one of Philadelphia's most exciting young, star chefs. His creative, boundary-pushing presentations at his highly respected Queen Village restaurant, Ela, have earned him accolades from press and public alike. Cichonski showcases his wide-range of skills with his down-to-earth bar, The Gaslight. He had the opportunity to display his incredible cooking skills on a national level as a contestant on the popular Bravo TV cooking competition, "Top Chef." Now he adds innovative cuisine to his repertoire, combining Mexican and Asian flavors for the high-quality 1100 Social. Cichonski was born in Northeast Philadelphia and grew up in Churchville, Bucks County, graduating from Council Rock High School. He studied culinary arts at the Restaurant School in University City at Walnut Hill College.rnrnAbout The Cordish CompaniesrnThe Cordish Companies' origins date back to 1910 and encompass four generations of privately-held, family ownership. During the past ten decades, The Cordish Companies has grown into a global leader in Real Estate Development, Gaming & Hospitality, Entertainment Management and International Urban Planning & Development. One of the largest and most respected developers in the world, The Cordish Companies has been awarded an unprecedented seven Urban Land Institute Awards for Excellence for public-private developments that are of unique significance to the cities in which they are located. Prime examples are The Cordish Companies' prominent role in the redevelopment of Baltimore's world famous Inner Harbor; Philadelphia, PA; Atlantic City, NJ; Charleston, SC; Houston, TX; Louisville, KY; Kansas City, MO and St. Louis, MO. In addition, The Cordish Companies has developed and operates multiple highly acclaimed entertainment destinations throughout the United States which welcome over 50 million visitors per year and are the most visited destinations in their respective regions. Over the generations, The Cordish Companies has remained true to the family's core values of quality, entrepreneurial spirit, long-term personal relationships and integrity. As a testimony to the long-term vision of its family leadership, The Cordish Companies still owns and manages virtually every business it has created. For more information visit www.cordish.com.rnrn"The Cordish Companies," "The Cordish Company" and "Cordish" are trademarks used under license by independent corporations, legal liability companies and partnerships ("Cordish Entities"). Each Cordish Entity is a separate, single-purpose legal entity that is solely responsible for its obligations and liabilities. No common operations or financial interdependency, and no intermingling of assets or liabilities of the Cordish Entities exists, or should be deemed to exist, as a result of the potential common reference to multiple independent entities operating under the names "Cordish," "The Cordish Companies" or "The Cordish Company" here or elsewhere.rnrnPhoto – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151014/276933rnrnSOURCE The Cordish CompaniesrnrnrnrnRELATED LINKSrnhttp://www.cordish.com

MAYOR NUTTER PROCLAIMS SEPTEMBER 8 OF 2015 AS ‘SOLIDARITY DAY OF THE WORLD HERITAGE CITIES’ IN PHILADELPHIA

MAYOR NUTTER PROCLAIMS TODAY ‘SOLIDARITY DAY OF THE WORLD HERITAGE CITIES’ IN PHILADELPHIArnPrnosted on September 8, 2015 by City of PhiladelphiarnrnPhiladelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter declared Tuesday, September 8, 2015 as “Solidarity Day of the World Heritage Cities” in Philadelphia through a proclamation issued at a joint press conference with the Global Philadelphia Association.rnrnThe City of Philadelphia is the only city in the United States that is an observer member of the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC). The Global Philadelphia Association and Mayor Nutter’s administration have been working collaboratively since 2012 on an initiative to make Philadelphia a full member of the Organization and thereby achieve status as the first World Heritage City in the U.S.rnrn“As the proud home of Independence Hall – the birthplace of democracy and a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1979 – Philadelphia stands in solidarity today with all World Heritage Cities as our city aspires to become the first World Heritage City in the U.S.,” said Mayor Nutter.rnrnA decision on Philadelphia’s proposal to become a full member is expected when the OWHC’s 13th World Congress convenes in the city of Arequipa, Peru November 3-6, 2015. A delegation of representatives from the City of Philadelphia and the Global Philadelphia Association will attend the Congress.rnrn“Today’s proclamation is an affirmation of Mayor Nutter’s support of the mission of the Organization of World Heritage Cities and his belief that our great city, with its rich history and a heritage of diversity, has shared interests and common bonds with the international community,” said Alan Greenberger, the City’s Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Director of Commerce.rnrnJohn F. Smith III, Chair of the Global Philadelphia Association’s Board of Directors, said, “We believe that designation as a World Heritage City would promote understanding of the region’s remarkable history – a history built on respect for many cultures, freedom, and democracy – and at the same time enhance Philadelphia’s global stature as a destination for international commerce, culture and tourism.”rnrnLast September 8, the City of Philadelphia marked Solidarity Day of the World Heritage Cities by renaming Walnut Street between 5th and 6th streets “World Heritage Way,” in a ceremony at Independence Hall.rnrnDriving home the World Heritage message, the Global Philadelphia Association will stage GlobalPhilly™ 2015, a 60-day exposition to showcase the city’s many international assets, starting Thursday, September 10. The expo will offer a lineup of 150 events and programs centered on international themes and issues. Member organizations will present events in eight categories: Advocacy, Arts, Commerce, Cuisine, Education, Heritage, Science & Technology and Sports. The opening ceremony for the Expo will be Thursday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the studios of WHYY, Independence Mall West, 150 N. 6th Street, in Philadelphia. To learn more about GlobalPhilly™ 2015 and the scheduled events, visit http://www.globalphiladelphia.org. GlobalPhilly™ 2015 runs through mid-November.rnrn rnrnAbout the Global Philadelphia AssociationrnrnThe Global Philadelphia Association (GPA) was founded in 2010 by leading international organizations in the Greater Philadelphia region. Its mission is to:rnrnAssist – and encourage greater interaction among – the many organizations and people who are engaged in international activity within the Greater Philadelphia region;rnPromote the development of an international consciousness within the region; andrnEnhance the region’s global profile. rnGPA is a nonprofit organization with more than 190 members, including businesses, organizations and internationally-minded individuals. rnrnMAYOR NUTTER’S PROCLAMATIONrnrn WHEREAS, the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC) was founded in Fez, Morocco on September 8, 1993, in order to promote the implementation of the World Heritage Convention, encourage cooperation and the exchange of information and expertise on matters of conservation and management, and develop a sense of solidarity among its member cities; andrnrn WHEREAS, the OWHC has grown over the years and now has over 250 member cities across the globe; andrnrn WHEREAS, the City of Philadelphia became an observer member of the OWHC in 2013 and, as such, has participated in the Organization’s activities since that time; andrnrn WHEREAS, given Philadelphia’s historical and cultural contributions to the world, their embodiment in the City’s fundamental design, its physical spaces, and structures – including Independence Hall, which became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979 – and the City’s innovative efforts to preserve, re-use, and re-invent those spaces and structures in a manner that honors their history, Philadelphia feels a special kinship with the member cities of the Organization; andrnrn WHEREAS, the City has joined with the Global Philadelphia Association in an initiative called Project World Heritage for the purposes of promoting an understanding on the part of our citizens and the larger world community of the value of the City’s heritage and the importance of its preservation, achieving full membership in the OWHC, developing relationships with other member cities for our mutual benefit, and learning from them and sharing our learning with them concerning the growth, health, and preservation of cities; andrnrn WHEREAS, one year ago, on September 8, 2014, the City of Philadelphia officially recognized Solidarity Day by naming Walnut Street, between 5th and 6th streets, which is the site of Independence Hall, as “World Heritage Way”;rnrn NOW THEREFORE: rnrn I, Michael A. Nutter, Mayor of the City of Philadelphia, do hereby proclaim September 8, 2015 to be celebrated asrnrnSolidarity Day of the World Heritage Citiesrnrnin Philadelphia, and urge all citizens to take advantage of this day both to share and promote our own heritage and to recognize the work of the Organization of World Heritage Cities in promoting heritage world-wide.rnrn rnrnMichael A. NutterrnrnMayor

World’s First Bilateral Hand Transplant on a Child Performed at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

–CHOP and Penn Medicine Collaborate on Groundbreaking Surgery–rn

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rnPHILADELPHIA, July 28, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Surgeons at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) joined with colleagues from Penn Medicine recently to complete the world's first bilateral hand transplant on a child. Earlier this month, the surgical team successfully transplanted donor hands and forearms onto eight-year-old Zion Harvey who, several years earlier, had undergone amputation of his hands and feet and a kidney transplant following a serious infection.rnrnLed by L. Scott Levin, M.D., FACS*, Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Penn Medicine, Director of the Hand Transplantation Program at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Professor of Surgery (Division of Plastic Surgery) at the Perelman School of Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania, a 40-member multidisciplinary team of physicians, nurses and other staff from plastic and reconstructive surgery, orthopaedic surgery, anesthesiology, and radiology, participated in the operation. Attending surgeons from CHOP and from Penn Medicine, along with Scott H. Kozin, M.D.***, chief of staff for Shriners Hospitals for Children—Philadelphia, collaborated during the 10-hour surgical transplantation.rnrn"This surgery was the result of years of training, followed by months of planning and preparation by a remarkable team," said Levin. "The success of Penn's first bilateral hand transplant on an adult, performed in 2011, gave us a foundation to adapt the intricate techniques and coordinated plans required to perform this type of complex procedure on a child. CHOP is one of the few places in the world that offer the capabilities necessary to push the limits of medicine to give a child a drastically improved quality of life."rnrn"This extraordinary accomplishment highlights the world-class abilities of the physicians, nurses, therapists and other staff who are privileged to serve our patients and their families with skill and dedication," said Madeline Bell, president and chief executive officer of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "I'm especially grateful to Zion's family who entrusted him to our care."rnrn"The ability to plan and carry out this type of surgery is testament to the skill, expertise, surgical innovation, and passion for excellence available here at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia," said N. Scott Adzick, M.D., CHOP's surgeon-in-chief. "I am extremely proud of Dr. Levin and his team for their courage, dedication and expertise, and appreciative to Zion and his family, whose bravery and trust in this clinical team is truly inspiring."rnrnZion was initially referred to Shriners Hospitals for Children for their expertise in pediatric orthopaedic care, including surgery and rehabilitation. Through a coordinated effort between Shriners Hospitals for Children and CHOP, Zion was evaluated as a possible recipient of the first pediatric hand transplant. "The collaborative effort between these institutions was necessary to assemble the team and organize the players to orchestrate such a complex and demanding procedure that had never been performed on a child," stated Scott H. Kozin, M.D., chief of staff for Shriners Hospitals for Children—Philadelphia.rnrnBefore the surgery could be conducted, it was first necessary to locate a suitable donor, a function coordinated by Gift of Life Donor Program, the nonprofit organ and tissue donor program which serves the eastern half of Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey and Delaware. "For 41 years, Gift of Life Donor Program has partnered with transplant centers throughout this region to bring innovative transplant procedures to patients in need," stated Richard Hasz, vice president of Clinical Services for Gift of Life. "As with all types of transplant, surgeries such as this one could not take place without the generosity of a donor and a donor family. We thank them for their selflessness and for their gift that made this surgery possible."rnrn"The skills necessary to perform such complex surgery at CHOP have been acquired from lessons learned over the past 20-plus years of performing pediatric solid organ transplantation," said Abraham Shaked, M.D., Ph.D., the Eldridge L. Eliason Professor of Surgery and Director, Penn Transplant Institute. "We have learned the importance of closely monitoring and managing the activity of the immune system through years of experience, and are hopeful that Zion will enjoy excellent long-term allograft function and a normal life."rnrnZion Harvey is a bright and precocious eight-year-old who has told his doctors that he cannot wait to someday throw a football. A happy and outgoing child, he has adapted well to life without hands, learning to eat, write and even play video games. He figured out ways to perform most of the activities other kids his age can do. Zion received prosthetics for his feet and is able to walk, run and jump with complete independence. Following his latest surgery and after his upcoming rehabilitation, it is expected that Zion will finally get his wish to throw a football along with a myriad of other accomplishments to come.rnrnDouble hand transplantation is a complex procedure involving many surgical and non-surgical components. First, the potential recipient must undergo extensive medical screenings and evaluations before surgery. In this case, the patient's previous medical condition, following sepsis at an early age, factored into the decision to perform the transplant. "Zion's kidney transplant following his infection made him a candidate for transplant because he was already taking anti-rejection medication," said Benjamin Chang, M.D.**, co-director of CHOP's Hand Transplantation Program as well as associate chief of the Division of Plastic Surgery at Penn Medicine.rnrnDuring the surgery, the hands and forearms from the donor were attached by connecting bone, blood vessels, nerves, muscles, tendons and skin. The surgical team was divided into four simultaneous operating teams, two focused on the donor limbs, and two focused on the recipient. First, the forearm bones, the radius and ulna, were connected with steel plates and screws. Next, microvascular surgical techniques were used to connect the arteries and veins. Once blood flow was established through the reconnected blood vessels, surgeons individually repaired and rejoined each muscle and tendon. Surgeons then reattached nerves and then closed the surgical sites.rnrnZion continues to receive daily immunosuppressant medications to prevent his body from rejecting the new limbs, as well as his transplanted kidney. Zion is being cared for by CHOP's nephrology and kidney transplant team, as well as his hand transplant surgical team. Post surgery, he spent a week in CHOP's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, then was moved to a medical unit and eventually moved to an inpatient rehabilitation unit where he undergoes rigorous hand therapy several times per day, an essential step to gaining improvement in function.rnrnThe clinical team expects Zion to spend several more weeks in CHOP's rehabilitation unit, and then to be discharged to his home in Baltimore, Md. Dr. Levin and his team will continue to follow Zion monthly in the short-term and then annually throughout his lifetime. rnrn(Additional Information)rnrn* L. Scott Levin, M.D., FACS, holds several medical posts. He is Director of the Hand Transplantation Program at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Penn Medicine; The Paul B. Magnuson Professor of Bone and Joint Surgery at Penn; and Professor of Surgery (Division of Plastic Surgery) at the Perelman School of Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania.rnrn**Dr. Benjamin Chang, M.D., is co-director of CHOP's Hand Transplant Program; associate chief of the Division of Plastic Surgery at Penn Medicine; and associate professor of Clinical Surgery at the Perelman School of Medicine at The University of Pennsylvania.rnrn***Scott H. Kozin, M.D., is chief of staff for Shriners Hospitals for Children and clinical professor of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Temple University School of Medicine.rnrnMedia B-roll, Photos and Illustrations (files will be available at 2:30 p.m. on 7/28/15):rnhttps://www.dropbox.com/sh/penojq4kv44g5xs/AAAIdj8mQ5EYnXye5UzEzZwXa?dl=0rnrnYouTube Video: http://bit.ly/1LOJXNRrnrnAbout The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia:rnrnThe Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 535-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.chop.edurnrnAbout Penn Medicine:rnrnPenn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4.9 billion enterprise.rnrnThe Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 17 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $409 million awarded in the 2014 fiscal year.rnrnThe University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania — recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; Chester County Hospital; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital — the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Chestnut Hill Hospital and Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine.rnrnPenn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2014, Penn Medicine provided $771 million to benefit our community.rnrnAbout the Gift of Life:rnrnSince 1974, Gift of Life has served as the link between donors and patients awaiting life-saving transplants in the eastern half of Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey and Delaware. Gift of Life Donor Program is the nation's most active and well-respected organ procurement organization, coordinating more than 38,000 life-saving organ transplants and approximately 550,000 tissue transplants during the last 41 years. For more information on organ and tissue donation, please call Gift of Life at 1-800-DONORS-1 or visit its website, www.donors1.org.rnrnAbout Shriners Hospitals for Children:rnrnShriners Hospitals for Children is dedicated to improving the lives of children by providing pediatric specialty care, innovative research and outstanding medical teaching programs for medical professionals. Children up to age 18 are eligible for care and receive all services in a family-centered environment, regardless of the patients' ability to pay. For more information visit, shrinershospitalsforchildren.org/Philadelphia.rnrnMEDIA CONTACT:rnAshley MoorernMoorea1@email.chop.edu rnOffice: 267-426-6071 or Cell: 215-630-4683rnrnPhoto – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150728/247814rnrn rnrnSOURCE The Children's Hospital of PhiladelphiarnrnrnrnRELATED LINKSrnhttp://www.chop.edu